You are not logged in. Press here to login.

Content

List volumes - List articles in this issue

SOCIOECONOMIC POSITION AND VARIATIONS IN COPING STRATEGIES IN MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY OF 1287 40- AND 50-YEAR-OLD MEN AND WOMEN

doi: 10.1080/16501970600766467

Open access

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between socioeconomic position and coping strategies in musculoskeletal pain.

Design and subjects: Cross-sectional study of a random sample of 40- and 50-year-old Danes, participation rate 69%, n=7125. The study included 1287 persons who reported functional limitations due to musculoskeletal pain.

METHODS: Data was collected by postal questionnaires and scales were developed on problem-solving coping and avoidant coping, based on a range of preliminary studies. Multivariate logistic regression analyses was used to study the correlation with socioeconomic position, measured by occupational social class.

RESULTS: Among women, there was no correlation between social class and avoidant coping, but a significant decrease in the use of problem-solving coping by decreasing social class, adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.64 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.31–5.32) in social class V vs social classes I + II. Among men, there was no correlation between social class and problem-solving coping, but a significant increase in the use of avoidant coping with decreasing social class, adjusted OR = 3.31 (95% CI 1.75–6.25) in V vs I + II.

CONCLUSION: It is important for clinicians who advise and support patients in their response to musculoskeletal pain to be aware of socioeconomic differences in coping strategies. Gender differences in the association between socioeconomic factors and coping should be further investigated.



Related articles

There are no related articles.


Actions


Abstract

PDF

Supplementary


There is no supplementary for this article.

Related articles


Click here to show related articles

Print information


Volume 38, Issue 5

DOI: 10.1080/16501970600766467

Pages: 316-321

View at PubMed