Content » Vol 43, Issue 4

Review article

Effects of selective tibial nerve neurotomy as a treatment for adults presenting with spastic equinovarus foot: a systematic review

Benjamin Bollens, Thierry Deltombe, Christine Detrembleur, Thierry Gustin, Gaëtan Stoquart, Thierry M. Lejeune
DOI: 10.2340/16501977-0786

Abstract

Objective: Spastic equinovarus foot is a major cause of disability for neurorehabilitation patients, impairing their daily activities, social participation and general quality of life. Selective tibial nerve neurotomy is a neurosurgical treatment for focal spasticity, whose acceptance as treatment for spastic equinovarus foot remains controversial. We performed a systematic review of the literature to assess the efficacy of tibial nerve neurotomy as a treatment for adult patients presenting with spastic equinovarus foot.
Methods: We queried PubMed, Science Direct, Trip Database and PEDro databases with the following keywords: “equinus deformity” OR “muscle spasticity” AND “neurotomy.”
Results: We selected a total of 11 non-randomized and uncontrolled studies, suggesting that neurotomy could be an efficient treatment to reduce impairments in spastic equinovarus foot patients.
Discussion: Our conclusions are based primarily on case series studies. The effects of tibial nerve neurotomy had not been compared with a reference treatment through a randomized controlled trial, which would be necessary to increase the level of scientific evidence. Moreover, further studies using quantitative, validated and objective assessment tools are required to evaluate the efficacy of tibial nerve neuro­tomy accurately based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health from the World Health Organization.

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