Content » Vol 43, Issue 5

Original report

Best candidates for cognitive treatment of illness perceptions in chronic low back pain: Results of a theory-driven predictor study

Petra C. Siemonsma, Ilse Stuvie, Leo D. Roorda, Joke Vollebregt, Gustaaf Lankhorst, Ant T. Lettinga
DOI: 10.2340/16501977-0803

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to identify treatment-specific predictors of the effectiveness of a method of evidence-based treatment: cognitive treatment of illness perceptions. This study focuses on what treatment works for whom, whereas most prognostic studies focusing on chronic non-specific low back pain rehabilitation aim to reduce the heterogeneity of the population of patients who are suitable for rehabilitation treatment in general.
Design: Three treatment-specific predictors were studied in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain receiving cognitive treatment of illness perceptions: a rational approach to problem-solving, discussion skills and verbal skills. Hierarchical linear regression analysis was used to assess their predictive value. Short-term changes in physical activity, measured with the Patient-Specific Functioning List, were the outcome measure for cognitive treatment of illness perceptions effect.
Results: A total of 156 patients with chronic non-specific low back pain participated in the study. Rational problem-solving was found to be a significant predictor for the change in physical activity. Discussion skills and verbal skills were non-significant. Rational problem-solving explained 3.9% of the total variance.
Conclusion: The rational problem-solving scale results are encouraging, because chronic non-specific low back pain problems are complex by nature and can be influenced by a variety of factors. A minimum score of 44 points on the rational problem-solving scale may assist clinicians in selecting the most appropriate candidates for cognitive treatment of illness perceptions.

Lay Abstract

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