Content » Preview

Original report

High-intensity arm resistance training does not lead to better outcomes than low-intensity resistance training in patients after subacute stroke: A randomized controlled trial

Susan Högg, Manfred Holzgraefe, Carolin Drüge, Frederik Hauschild, Christoph Herrmann, Mark Obermann, Jan Mehrholz
Department of Physiotherapy, Asklepios Kliniken Schildautal, Seesen, Germany.
DOI: 10.2340/16501977-2686

Preview of fully accepted paper, still not published in any volume

Abstract

Objective: To describe the effects of 2 levels of intensity of arm resistance training on grip strength, arm function, activities, participation, and adverse events in patients with subacute stroke.
Design: A randomized controlled and preregistered trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding and intention-to-treat analysis.
Patients: Patients with subacute stroke and upper extremity hemiparesis.
Methods: After randomization the experimental group received a 3-week high-intensity arm resistance training (HIT). The control group completed a 3-week low-intensity arm resistance training (LIT). The primary outcome was grip strength. Secondary outcomes included the Motricity Index, Fugl-Meyer Assessment for the upper limb, Box and Block Test, Goal Attainment Scale, Modified Ashworth Scale, and adverse events. All outcomes were assessed at baseline and after 3 weeks of intervention.
Results: A total of 43 patients were investigated (HIT, n = 23; LIT, n = 20). All primary and secondary outcomes improved after the 3-week training, but no significant between-group differences were found. Adverse events occurred in 5% of training sessions (19/369).
Conclusion: The results of this study did not show differential effects on any outcome of 2 forms of arm resistance training in patients with subacute stroke.

Lay Abstract

The aim of this study was to describe the effects of 2 levels of intensity of arm resistance training to improve grip strength, arm function, activities, participation, and adverse events in patients with subacute stroke. Patients were randomized after a stroke to either a 3-week high-intensity arm resistance training (HIT) or a 3-week low-intensity arm resistance training (LIT). The following measurements were performed: grip strength, Motricity Index, Fugl-Meyer Assessment for the upper limb, Box and Block Test, Goal Attainment Scale, Modified Ashworth Scale, and adverse events before and after 3 weeks of training. A total of 43 patients were included. No significant differences were found between groups. Neither the HIT nor the LIT led to an increase in spasticity. The results did not show differential effects of different arm resistance training intensities on any outcome in patients with subacute stroke.

Comments

Do you want to comment on this paper? The comments will show up here and if appropriate the comments will also separately be forwarded to the authors. You need to login/create an account to comment on articles. Click here to login/create an account.
Advertisement