Original report

Cognitive and emotional problems in patients after cerebral meningioma surgery

Sanne van der Vossen , Vera P.M. Schepers, Jan Willem Berkelbach van der Sprenkel , Johanna M. A. Visser-Meily, Marcel W.M. Post
DOI: 10.2340/16501977-1795


Objectives: To determine long-term cognitive complaints and symptoms of depression or anxiety in patients following surgery for a cerebral meningioma, and to examine factors associated with these outcomes.
Design: Cross-sectional study.
Patients: Patients operated on for a cerebral meningioma in the University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands, between 2007 and 2009.
Methods: Clinical data were retrieved from medical files. Patients completed a postal questionnaire. Cognitive complaints were measured with the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire. A score above 43.5 was defined as presence of cognitive complaints. Anxiety and depressive symptoms were measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and were considered present if the scale score was ≥ 8.
Results: The response rate was 76% (n = 136). Mean time after operation was 32.6 months (standard deviation 10.6 months). Overall, 40% of patients experienced cognitive and/or emotional problems. Thirty-one patients (23%) experienced cognitive complaints, 39 (29%) showed anxiety, and 31 (23%) showed depressive symptoms. Country of birth and previous depression/burn-out were the most important factors. Scores on all outcome measures were related to each other.
Conclusion: Forty percent of patients experienced cognitive or emotional problems following surgery for a cerebral meningioma. Screening for these problems is therefore important in order to provide patients with the care they require as soon as possible.

Supplementary content