Content » Vol 53, Issue 6

Original report

Societal burden of stroke rehabilitation: Costs and health outcomes after admission to stroke rehabilitation

Winke van Meijeren-Pont, Sietske J. Tamminga, Paulien H. Goossens, Iris F. Groeneveld, Henk Arwert , Jorit J.L. Meesters, Radha Rambaran Mishre, Thea P.M. Vliet Vlieland, Wilbert B. van den Hout on behalf of the Stroke Cohort Outcomes of REhabilitation (SCORE) study group
Basalt Rehabilitation/ Department of Orthopaedics, Rehabilitation, and Physical, Therapy, Leiden University Medical Center, AL Leiden, The Netherlands: E-mail: w.pont@basaltrevalidatie.nl
DOI: 10.2340/16501977-2829

Abstract

Objective: To estimate societal costs and changes in health-related quality of life in stroke patients, up to one year after start of medical specialist rehabilitation.
Design: Observational.
Patients: Consecutive patients who received medical specialist rehabilitation in the Stroke Cohort Outcomes of REhabilitation (SCORE) study.
Methods: Participants completed questionnaires on health-related quality of life (EuroQol EQ-5D-3L), absenteeism, out-of-pocket costs and healthcare use at start and end of rehabilitation and 6 and 12 months after start. Clinical characteristics and rehabilitation costs were extracted from the medical and financial records, respectively.
Results: From 2014 to 2016 a total of 313 stroke patients completed the study. Mean age was 59 (standard deviation (SD) 12) years, 185 (59%) were male, and 244 (78%) inpatients. Mean costs for inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation were US$70,601 and US$27,473, respectively. For inpatients, utility (an expression of quality of life) increased significantly between baseline and 6 months (EQ-5D-3L 0.66–0.73, p = 0.01; visual analogue scale 0.77–0.82, p < 0.001) and between baseline and 12 months (visual analogue scale 0.77–0.81, p < 0.001).
Conclusion: One-year societal costs from after the start of rehabilitation in stroke patients were considerable. Future research should also include costs prior to rehabilitation. For inpatients, health-related quality of life, expressed in terms of utility, improved significantly over time.

Lay Abstract

The objective of this study was to estimate societal costs and changes in health-related quality of life in stroke patients, up to one year after the start of rehabilitation. Participants were stroke patients who received inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation. They completed questionnaires on quality of life, absenteeism, out-of-pocket costs and healthcare use at start and end of rehabilitation and 6 and 12 months after the start of rehabilitation. Rehabilitation costs were obtained from the financial records. From 2014 to 2016 a total of 313 patients completed the study. Mean age was 59 years, 185 (59%) were male and 244 (78%) inpatients. Mean costs for inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation were $70,601 and $27,473, respectively. For inpatients, health-related quality of life increased significantly between baseline and 6 months, and between baseline and 12 months. In conclusion, societal costs one year after the start of rehabilitation were considerable and health-related quality of life improved for inpatients.

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