Content » Vol 46, Issue 7

Original report

Perceived difficulty in use of everyday technology in persons with acquired brain injury of different severity: A comparison with controls

Mandana Fallahpour, Anders Kottorp, Louise Nygård, Maria Larsson Lund
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Division of Occupational Therapy, Box 23200, SE-141 83 Huddinge, Sweden. E-mail: Mandana.Fallahpour@ki.se
DOI: 10.2340/16501977-1818

Abstract

Objective: To compare the perceived difficulty in use of everyday technology in persons with acquired brain injury with different levels of severity of disability with that of controls.
Methods: This comparison study recruited 2 samples of persons with acquired brain injury and controls, comprising a total of 161 participants, age range 18–64 years. The long and short versions of the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire and the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale were used to evaluate participants.
Results: Persons with acquired brain injury demonstrated lower mean levels of perceived ability in use of everyday technology than controls (F = 21.84, degrees of freedom = 1, p < 0.001). Further analysis showed a statistically significant mean difference in perceived difficulty in use of everyday technology between persons with severe disability and good recovery, between persons with severe disability and controls, and between persons with moderate disability and controls. No significant mean difference was found between persons with severe disability and moderate disability, between persons with moderate disability and good recovery, and between persons with good recovery and controls.
Conclusion: Perceived difficulty in using everyday technology is significantly increased among persons with acquired brain injury with severe to moderate disability compared with controls. Rehabilitation services should consider the use of everyday technology in order to increase participation in everyday activities after acquired brain injury.

Lay Abstract

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