Content » Vol 48, Issue 9

Short communication

Stochastic resonance therapy induces increased movement related caudate nucleus activity

Oliver Kaut, Benjamin Becker, Christine Schneider, Feng Zhou, Klaus Fliessbach, René Hurlemann, Ullrich Wüllner
Dept. of Neurology, University of Bonn, 53105 Bonn, Germany. E-mail: oliver.kaut@ukb.uni-bonn.de
DOI: 10.2340/16501977-2143

Abstract

Objective: Whole-body vibration can be used to supplement canonical physical treatment. It is performed while probands stand on a vibrating platform. Therapeutic vibration can be generated as a stochastic vibratory pattern, referred to as stochastic resonance whole-body vibration (SR-WBV). Despite the widespread use of SR-WBV its neurophysiological mechanism is unclear.
Design: A randomized sham-controlled double-blinded trial was performed as a pilot study. The experimental group received 6 cycles of SR-WBV at a frequency of 7 Hz with the SR-Zeptor device, and the sham group received the same treatment at a frequency of 1 Hz. At baseline 1.5 T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed in the resting state, together with a finger/foot tapping test. A second fMRI was carried out after SR-WBV as sham treatment in both groups. Subsequently, a second cycle of SR-WBV was performed as sham or verum with consecutive fMRI, followed by a final fMRI on day 2.
Subjects: Nineteen healthy volunteers were allocated to the experimental or sham group, respectively.
Results and conclusion: Analyses of specific effects revealed a significant treatment × time interaction effect (p < 0.05, small-volume corrected (SVC FWE-corrected)) in the left caudate nucleus during intermediate difficulty when comparing pre- vs post-SR-WBV treatment in the verum group. This proof-of-concept study suggests the existence of cerebral effects of SR-WBV.

Lay Abstract

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